Bishop Steam-to-Vacuum Engine



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About the STV Engine

History

The first steam-to-vacuum engine was invented by Thomas Newcomen in 1705. It was in use for 80 years until replaced by the more efficient steam engine of James Watt. . .
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How it Works

The STV Engine changes solar heat (or any available fuel) into usable power. Water is heated to 230 degrees F. to make steam by solar heat or by a least costly available fuel of choice. Steam is then condensed by use of a cooling fluid (water) which forms a vacuum in the entire space of a cylinder. Atmospheric air pressure, which is free of cost, pushes the piston in the cylinder to fill the cylinder end-to-end with great force in a power stroke. . .
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Video of the Prototype  1 min. 5 sec.




Detailed Description of the STV Engine

The STV engine utilizes the vacuum made when steam is cooled and expanded to condense to water droplets. Water in the Steam Boiler is heated to 230 degrees F. to make steam. Steam from the boiler fills a twin steam cylinder/piston on an intake-of-steam stroke. 1,700 units of steam condense down to 1 unit of water with the remaining space units in vacuum. . .
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